CASE FOR A PERMANENT EXTENSION OF THE No 22 BUS ROUTE INTO BARNES VILLAGE.

Summary

Barnes residents want TfL to permanently extend the frequent and well-used 22 bus service from The Spencer pub at Putney Common into Barnes Village. This extension is short: only 1.5 miles.  TfL states that it regularly reviews the bus network and develops proposals for change to meet passenger requirements.  Barnes residents ask TfL to review and evaluate this proposal.
 
A small team of Barnes residents (Team 22) was set up in conjunction with the Barnes Town Centre Manager to evaluate, through a survey, the demand for such an extension.  Over 3000 residents have indicated their support, equating to a potential of 24,000 single trips per week. Annex A provides detailed analysis of survey responses and Annex B a sample of the comments submitted revealing the depth of support.  The proposal is supported by the local MP and ward councilors.

Team 22 is keen to work with TfL and Richmond Council to achieve this extension quickly, especially due to the imminent emergency and structural repairs to Hammersmith Bridge and the resultant transport disruption.

 Justification for the extension to Barnes Village


There is a proven demand and overwhelming support for a permanent east-west bus route from Barnes Village over Putney Bridge into central London via Fulham, Parsons Green, Chelsea, Knightsbridge and Piccadilly on one bus with one fare.
Over 3,000 residents support this proposal. This is not a new idea. Requests have been made to TfL a number of times over the last 20 years. The N22 night bus already runs through Barnes.  Data collected from survey respondents’ alone estimates that an extension of the 22 bus would result in a potential of 24,000 single trips per week.  The additional revenue generated from these trips should pay for this small extension. In addition the cost of the recently cancelled 283 bus service could be offset against any additional costs for the extension of the 22.

 It will provide an essential alternative bus route out of and into Barnes when Hammersmith Bridge is closed for emergency and structural repairs.
Barnes has no tube so relies heavily on buses. When traffic is curtailed on Hammersmith Bridge, Barnes residents will have no direct links to the tube network nor be able to cross the river easily. An extension to the 22 bus route into Barnes would provide direct links to the tube network, river transport at Putney Pier and central London. It will also provide access to Central London for passengers with reduced mobility.

 It will provide direct and safe public transport service to hospitals, schools and neighbouring communities from Barnes.
The Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, The Royal Marsden Hospital, the Royal Brompton Hospital, a number of Putney and Fulham schools and Chelsea and Fulham football grounds are all accessible along the 22 route. Parking is difficult at all these locations. The use of 22 bus from Barnes would reduce the numbers of cars on the roads, decrease congestion and produce a greener and less polluted environment.  It will also eliminate a long, dark and isolated path across Putney common which residents find unsafe.


It will provide a valuable public transport link for visitors into Barnes from Putney and Fulham, Parsons Green, Chelsea and central London. 
Visitors come to Barnes for a variety of reasons: to visit friends and family, the shops, the restaurants, the Olympic cinema, the Wetlands Centre, the secondary schools (St Paul’s, The Swedish School and the Harrodian) and the widely used leisure and sporting facilities at Barn Elms and Rocks Lane.  The use of the 22 bus would reduce car usage, congestion, parking problems in Barnes and air pollution in addition to the economic benefits to Barnes businesses.

 It will help decrease air pollution by encouraging people to use public transport switching from cars – a key policy of the Mayor.

Annex C reveals existing high car usage into and out of Barnes. An example being 48% of trips from Barnes to Fulham/Parsons Green are made by car/taxis. The lack of public transport must be a contributory factor.

Appendix C

Appendix B

Appendix A